5 Positive Effects of Giving Up Fast Fashion

April 20, 2018 0 Comments

5 Positive Effects of Giving Up Fast Fashion

Yes, that includes Old Navy. Yes, that includes TJ Maxx. Yes, that includes Zara, H&M, Forever 21 (do people still shop here?), and Target (we know, we know...sorry, it's the truth about their fashion at least). The amount of brands and labels that DO NOT CARE about the environment is staggering. This isn't a guilt trip, this isn't fast-fashion-shaming, this is a reality check. It's not meant to do anything other than educate you on where, exactly, your money is going, why you should think twice before buying that $10 top, and what you can do instead.

While we'd love to trust that simply listing all of these terrible facts would spur the change needed, there is SO MUCH negativity in the world right now, and we don't want to be Debby-downers. Plus, we're firm believers that educating onesself on the problem is only half the battle. Sure, you can update your facebook profile pic, you can pass on a pamphlet, but real change comes with action from the heart. So we've added a "What can I do?" bit to each reason listed. Put yourself out there, shout it from the mountain tops, or simply change your buying / dressing / styling to reflect your values. Baby steps, people. 

We've also included a blurb after each point on what, exactly, Joon + Co. is doing to help.

Let's tell the fashion industry that we're sick of child labor, we won't tolerate plastic clothes that will take centuries to biodegrade, and we don't give our money to companies who show such disregard for the planet, its people, and its animals. Let's be the change and stop waiting for others to take the reins. It's our chance to make history, and our change to change the world.

BTW - some of these are tough to hear, so we recommend grabbing a cold brewski or glass of merlot. 😬😬😬

Joon + Co. Sustainable Fashion

5 EFFECTIVE WAYS TO HELP THE PLANET BY GIVING UP FAST FASHION FOR GOOD

ONE [EDUCATE YOURSELF, YOUR FRIENDS, YOUR MOM, YOUR DOG, ETC.]

The fashion industry is the world's second largest polluter, second only to the oil industry. Let that sink in a bit.

WHAT CAN I DO?
Keep reading. Spread the word. OH, and stop polluting this beautiful planet with fast fashion (duh).

WHAT JOON + CO. IS DOING TO HELP:
Doing our part to educate the world on the issues facing the fashion industry and teaching what they can do to have the greatest impact. Showing that sustainable clothing can be fashionable and easy to find.

TWO [OPT FOR BRANDS GIVING EDUCATION OVER AID]

1 in 6 people are employed in the global fashion industry. Most of them are women earning less than $3 per day.

WHAT CAN I DO?
Find community-driven brands teaching not aiding. Labels and brands focusing on educating their workers rather than just giving them charity is the most sustainable way to help. There's nothing wrong with charity, BTW, just opting for the most sustainable solution 😉.

WHAT JOON + CO. IS DOING TO HELP:
Finding stylish, sustainable clothing with a luxe timeless aesthetic is no easy feat. We're scouring the globe to bring you brands like Jungle Folk and IchCha that focus on teaching life skills to the women rather than simply giving out charity.

THREE [THE USA NEEDS TO USE THEIR POWERS FOR GOOD]

    People living in the USA are the largest consumers of fashion in the world. With 80 billion pieces of clothing consumed globally every year, we (the USA) are consuming too much.

    WHAT CAN I DO?
    As Americans, we have the power to change the world. Our sheer massive size, population, resources, and blatant lack of reserve when it comes to demanding what we want. We are change makers, so let's flex our change-making muscle because the world could use some good coming from our country. From our country leaders to the Women's March to our garment workers and fashion bloggers (Oh hey, Sustainably Chic ). 

    As for other countries? Set or in some cases, keep setting an example (heyo, Ethical Unicorn). We are a powerful nation, but still have much to learn from the rest of the world, whether our leaders realize that or not.

    WHAT JOON + CO. IS DOING TO HELP:
    While we strive to have a variety of brands, we make sure to include brands like CP Shades, Alabama Chanin, Hackwith Design House, and Groceries Apparel who keep production local and labels like Article 22 and It Is Well L.A. who are USA based but have a highly sustainable global impact.

    FOUR [NOT ALL COTTONS ARE CREATED EQUAL]

    Traditional cotton causes a major strain on our environment and the farmers. About 7,000 liters of water are needed to make a single pair of jeans, which is approximately the amount of water one person drinks in 5-6 years. 250,000 Indian cotton farmers have killed themselves in the last 15 years due to the stress of debt accumulated from buying genetically modified cotton seeds to keep up with industry demand.

    WHAT CAN I DO?
    Look for GOTS certified organic cotton, which takes about 71% less water and 62% less energy than regular cotton is a great option. No toxins are used, farmers are paid a fair wage, and sustainability is top priority. Also, learn about Tencel, lyocell, silk, and alpaca wool as those are all sustainable, natural fibers doing their part to lessen our footprint. 

    FIVE [DON'T GET TRICKED OR DISTRACTED]

    Fast fashion has become so cheap that it feels almost disposable. These giant companies are obsessed with the bottom line and garments often fall apart after a single wear or wash. They trick you into thinking you're always out of style and have nothing to wear. They sell you things you don't need. They don't care about you, the environment, or its people. Sorry, it's a hard truth.

    WHAT CAN I DO? 
    Learn what your own style is, and use that as your guiding light when shopping. Books like The Curated Closet (and upcoming workbook) by Anushka Rees are great resources because they not only walk you step by step through finding your style, but teach you how to responsibly dispose of, re-use, and continuously curate your existing wardrobe and personal style.

    Also, it's like dieting. If you're obsessed with pasta and on a low-carb diet, you probably want to avoid Italian restaurants. Same with fast fashion. If you're typically a victim of the "closet full of nothing to wear" or feel a constant need to keep up with trends, stay out of fast fashion stores - you are their prey. Take the time you would've spent buying things you don't need to fine-tune your personal style and save up for those investment pieces that will take your style and image to the next level.


    SHOP OUR SUSTAINABLE, FAIR TRADE, AND COMMUNITY DRIVEN COLLECTIONS NOW

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    Sizing Chart

     

     Size # Size Bust (in) Waist (in) Hip (in)
    XS 0-2 32-34 25-26.5 34-36
    S 4-6 34.5-36 27-28.5 36.5-38.5
    M 8-10 36.5-38 29-30.5 39-41
    L 12-14 38.5-41 31-32.5 41.5-43.5

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